Who are Visitors?

Visitors are persons who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada, and are legally authorized to enter Canada to:

  • visit Canada on holiday (vacation),
  • visit family,
  • conduct business, etc.

Visitors are restricted in length of stay and subject to various conditions.

 

Do I need a Temporary Resident Visa?

Persons who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada may require a visa to enter Canada. The requirement for a visa also applies to temporary residents who are transiting in Canada.

If you do not require a visa to enter Canada, you may require an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA).

 

What is a Temporary Resident Visa?

A Temporary Resident Visa (TRV), also referred to as a visitor visa, is an official document issued by a Canadian visa office that is placed in your passport to show that you have met the requirements for admission to Canada as a temporary resident (either as a visitor, a student, or a worker).

Important information: You must obtain a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) before your departure. You cannot obtain one upon arrival in Canada.

 

What are the requirements you must meet for a TRV?

You must show the officer that you meet the requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and that you will be in Canada for a temporary stay.

You must also:

  • satisfy an officer that you will leave Canada at the end of your stay,
  • show that you have enough money to maintain yourself and your family members in Canada and to return home,
  • not intend to work or study in Canada unless authorized to do so,
  • be law abiding and have no record of criminal activity,
  • not be a risk to the security of Canada,
  • provide any additional document requested by the officer to establish your admissibility, and
  • be in good health (complete a medical examination if required).

What if I was previously granted permanent resident status?

If you have ever been granted permanent residence or landed immigrant status in Canada, you may still be a permanent resident. We cannot issue you a TRV if you are a permanent resident.

You may instead want to apply for Travel Document (Permanent Resident Abroad). If you meet the requirements for a travel document, you can return to Canada as a permanent resident.

If you no longer want to be a permanent resident, or if you know you do not meet the requirements to keep your permanent resident status, you can voluntarily give up (renounce) your permanent resident status in order to apply for a TRV.

Voluntary Renunciation of PR status applications must be sent in a separate envelope by mail to the visa office.
We recommend that you apply for Voluntary Renunciation of your PR status first, and apply for your TRV once you receive the approval of your Voluntary Renunciation.

 

Are there medical requirements?

If you plan to visit or study for six months or less:

You usually do not need a medical exam.

If you plan to visit or study for more than six months:

You will need a medical exam.

You may either:

have an upfront medical exam by contacting a Panel Physician; or
wait until your application is reviewed and medical instructions are given to you by the visa office.

When medical results are submitted up front, routine cases benefit from faster processing since we do not have to ask for them at a later date. This is done at your own cost and does not influence the final decision on your application. If you have an upfront medical exam, you must submit proof that you completed the medical exam with your application. Failure to do so may result in processing delays.

 

Are there biometric requirements?

You and your family members may need to appear in person to have your fingerprints and photograph (biometric information) taken at a biometric collection service point.

All family members who need their fingerprints and photograph taken and who are applying together should go to the same biometric collection service point.

You must not have your biometric fingerprints and photo taken before you submit your application. You can have your biometrics collected:

  • after you
    submit your application;
    pay your application and biometric fees; and
    get a biometric instruction letter which will direct you to a list of points of service you may choose from;
    or
  • at the same time as you are submitting your application in person at a Visa Application Centre (VAC).

 

Can I work or study during my stay in Canada?

Visitors are not allowed to work or study in Canada unless they are authorized to do so under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations. In many cases, a work or study permit will be required.

A temporary resident may also take a program of study up to six months duration without having to obtain a study permit.